Thesis topic: Dose Distribution Analysis and Optimisation for Stereotactic Irradiation with a Linear Accelerator

The objective of this work is to perform verification of dose distributions calculated with a treatment planning system (TPS), which will provide the basis for creation of a comprehensive test of TPS for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT).
Monte Carlo (MC) techniques should be used to model the accelerator and to calculate the dose distribution in the patient’s body. Calculated photon beam parameters should be compared with the measurements and should be used as input-data for TPS.
For more information please contact Prof. A. Wysocka-Rabin by email addressed to Anna.Wysocka (at) ncbj.gov.pl.

PhD degree scholarship – experimental neutrino physics

Competition opened on: 20 June 2018

Application submission deadline: 30 August 2018

NCBJ is inviting students of physics to apply for 4 year-duration doctoral studies in Warsaw Neutrino Group in the T2K neutrino experiment. Partially scholarship will be covered by funding from OPUS-2016/21/B/ST2/01092 project financed by National Science Center (NCN). The student is expected to complete his/her PhD degree thesis in elementary particle experimental physics during that time.

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Graduate Seminar, 4th June

Speaker: Viktor Svensson

Title: Tensor Network techniques for many-body systems

Abstract: In quantum many-body systems of even moderate sizes, Hilbert space is far too large to fit on a computer. This makes numerical calculations a challenge. With the use of tensor networks, certain classes of quantum states can be efficiently represented and computed. In this talk, I will give an introduction to tensor networks and what they are good for.

 

Graduate Seminar, 28th May

Speaker:  Oleksandr Kovalenko

Title: Experimental tests of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics

Abstract:  The Deep Inelastic Scattering and Drell-Yan processes can’t be directly calculated. The factorization concept assumes that the cross sections of these processes can be expressed as a convolution of parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions (FFs). These functions can’t be obtained from the theory and require an input form the experiment. The seminar will be focused on the techniques that are used to extract the FFs for pp and ep collisions. The comparison of theoretical estimates of FFs and the most recent experimental results on neutral meson spectra will be given.

Graduate Seminar, 21st May

Speaker: Erik Kofoed

Title:  Asymptotic Freedom at Finite Temperatures and Densities

Abstract: It is well known fact that the strong coupling constant in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) becomes weak at high energies which allows for perturbative calculations using Feynman diagrams. This is the phenomenon of asymptotic freedom. Much less clear is the status of asymptotic freedom at the early stages of a heavy ion collision where a bulk QCD medium is present. One difficulty is that there is, unlike in vacuum, no ‘best’ definition of what we mean with a coupling constant. The analysis is also complicated by the fact that a medium is characterised by several dimensionful scales, making the powerful scaling relations that can be used in vacuum not applicable

Thesis topic proposal

Dark matter: theoretical models, particle candidates and prospects of their experimental discovery

The Particle Theory Group led by Prof. Leszek Roszkowski invites applications for a 4- year PhD studentship at the National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ). The studentship is funded by National Science Centre (Narodowe Centrum Nauki, NCN) within the Maestro grant “Dark matter: theoretical models, particle candidates and prospects of their experimental discovery”.

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Graduate Seminar, 14th May

Speaker: Artem Poliszczuk

Title: Searching for AGNs in the infrared data

Abstract: In the era of big data driven astronomy creating trustable catalogs of astronomical objects plays crucial role in observational cosmology. In particular, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) catalogs still cause many difficulties for the observers. In my presentation I will briefly discuss the general properties of different types of AGNs and focus on their identification in the infrared passbands due to the high AGN selection efficiency in this part of the spectrum.

Graduate Seminar, 30th April

Speaker: Oleg Shkola

Title: Searches for heavy stable charged particles at Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

Abstract: Many extensions of the Standard Model (SM) predict the existence of heavy, long-lived charged particles (HSCPs). These particles might have speed significantly less than speed of light and/or charge, not equal to ±1e. With lifetimes greater than a few nanoseconds, HSCPs can travel distances larger than the typical collider detector and appear stable like pions or kaons. Because particle identification algorithms at hadron collider experiments generally assume signatures characteristic of Standard Model (SM) particles, e.g., speed close to the speed of light and a charge of ± 1e, HSCPs may go unidentified. A further complication arises from the fact that HSCPs might be charged during only a part of their passage through detectors, further limiting the ability of standard algorithms to identify them. It is however possible to detect HCPs making use of their higher rate of energy loss via ionization (dE/dx) and longer time of flight to the outer detectors, in comparison with SM particles. During the seminar, results of dedicated searches, done at Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment on data collected during 2016 will be discussed.